PhD Students


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Lindsey Boulet (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Glen Foster

Current Research: Lindsey’s research interests include the effects of environmental stressors on the cardiopulmonary system, ultrasound imaging techniques and advanced data analysis techniques. Lindsey’s PhD thesis aims to rigorously assess the utility of a commonly used contrast echocardiographic technique that is used in the interrogation of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses. He aims to determine the stability of the contrast agent under simulated physiological conditions, to apply a mathematical model to accurately quantify flow in a continuous circuit and finally to validate the model in humans during exercise.

Awards: Killam Memorial Doctoral Scholarship, NSERC Canada Graduate Doctoral Scholarship, Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

Lindsey completed his BSc. at Mount Royal University in Calgary, AB (2014) and his MSc. at UBCO (2017). Aside for his passion for science, Lindsey enjoys hiking, biking, swimming, climbing and most of all, snowboarding.

Contact: lindsey.boulet@alumni.ubc.ca


Christina Bruce (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Chris McNeil

Current Research: Christina’s research interests include studying the effects of environmental stress on the human neuromuscular system. Specifically, Christina is interested in the acute and long term effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia on the fatiguing neuromuscular system and how this may change following high altitude acclimatization.

Awards: NSERC Postgraduate Scholarship-Doctoral Award, British Columbia Graduate Scholarship, Graduate Dean’s Aboriginal Entrance Fellowship, Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship Award, NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Award, and The Alexander Rutherford Scholarship.

Future Aspirations: Christina aspires to work with national and international researchers, advancing the field of integrative human physiology while pursuing a career which generates effective modes of science communication for various audiences.

Christina completed her BSc at Mount Royal University in Calgary, AB (2015) and her MSc at UBCO (2019). Outside of academia, Christina continues to pursue an active musical career where she performs with various artists on a local, national and international level.

Contact: christina.bruce@alumni.ubc.ca


Hannah Caldwell (PhD Student)

Supervisor: Dr. Philip Ainslie

Current Research: Hannah’s research focuses on cerebrovascular regulation and neurovascular coupling responses during exercise and passive heat stress. Her further research interests extend to applied sport performance and clinical applications such as: 1) body temperature regulation in world-class para-athletes competing in the heat; and 2) cerebrovascular health in pre-diabetic individuals with exogenous ketone supplementation, respectively.

Awards: NSERC Postgraduate Doctoral Scholarship, British Columbia Graduate Scholarship, and Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

Hannah grew up in Kelowna and has completed her BHK at UBCO. She has been working in Phil Ainslie’s lab since 2015 and has completed field expeditions to high altitude in California, USA as well as working with elite apnea free divers in Cavtat, Croatia. Hannah enjoys road cycling, rock climbing, and playing soccer.

Contact: hannah.caldwell@ubc.ca


Jordan (Jay) Carr (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Phil Ainslie

Current Research: Jay’s research interests include cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses to both exercise and altered blood gases, particularly long term adaptation caused by increased shear-stress and blood flow, as well as activity of vasoactive agents. Jay is also interested in neuromuscular fatigue and adaptation in the neuromuscular system that contributes to elite performance.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship, University Graduate Fellowship

Jay completed his MLitt at The University of Aberdeen, Scotland, then moved to Kelowna in 2018. He enjoys climbing, snowboarding, philosophy, and music.

Contact: j.carr@alumni.ubc.ca


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Geoff Coombs (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Philip Ainslie

Current Research:The focus of Geoff’s PhD thesis is to determine the vascular responses to acute and chronic exposures to heat stress. He aims to not only uncover the mechanisms underlying heat-induced improvements in vascular function, but to determine the optimal magnitude and duration of heating necessary to improve vascular health. The implications of his studies could shed light on potential therapy for individuals with high cardiovascular risk or limited exercise capacity (e.g. spinal cord injury).

Awards: NSERC PGS and Killam doctoral scholarships

Geoff previously completed his BSc and MSc in Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa where he studied the thermoregulatory responses to exercise under the combined stressors heat and hypoxia. He enjoys team sports, cycling, hiking, camping, and now also skiing.

Contact: geoff.coombs@ubc.ca


Kaela Cranston (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Mary Jung

Kaela’s research interests include community engaged research, tailoring current community programs to Indigenous communities, digitizing training workshops, and assessing fidelity of programs. Kaela’s PhD thesis aims to work with Indigenous communities in British Columbia to tailor the Small Steps for Big Changes community diabetes prevention program to better suit their needs and wants, and to digitize the train-the-trainer workshop for new Small Steps for Big Changes coaches. She aims to work directly with community members and stakeholders to co-develop and test both projects and to report on the process.

Awards: WorkSafe BC, Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship, University Graduate Fellowship

Kaela completed her BSC at Brandon University (2016), and her MSc at UBCO (2019). Outside of academia, Kaela enjoys cycling, skiing, basketball, camping and hiking.

Contact: kaela.cranston@ubc.ca


Mathew Debenham (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Brian Dalton

Current Research: The focus of Mathew’s PhD thesis is to investigate the effects of hypoxia on quiet standing balance. Specifically, he aims to determine how hypoxic conditions alter the neuromuscular system and the vestibular control of standing balance.

Mathew previously completed a bachelor’s degree in Human Kinetics and a master’s degree in Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, both from the University of Guelph. During his graduate studies he investigated time-dependent neuromuscular mechanisms with a specific focus on rate of torque development and electromechanical delay. He enjoys hiking, rock climbing and playing hockey.

Contact: mdebenham@alumni.ubc.ca


Tineke Dineen (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Mary Jung

Tineke Dineen is a Doctoral student in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences. She completed her BSc Honours in Human Kinetics at the University of Guelph before pursuing a Master’s of Science at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. She also has over 2 years experience working as a Clinical Research Associate for the Clinical Trials Unit at the University of Calgary.

Her main research interests focus on learning more about how and why community programs are effective for individuals with or at risk for type 2 diabetes. Currently, she is conducting a process and outcome evaluation for the Small Steps for Big Changes program to enable us to understand how best to facilitate and implement complex interventions, permitting improvement in their delivery and the ability to translate interventions into new settings. Her second PhD project will investigate a process and outcome evaluation of the Gro Health digital program as it translates from the United Kingdom to Canada, exploring user experiences, application acceptability and feasibility of a low carbohydrate diet as a treatment option for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Tineke’s research in the Diabetes Prevention Research Group will focus on process evaluations using mixed methods.

Contact: tdineen@mail.ubc.ca


Cody Durrer (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Jonathan Little

Current Research: Cody’s research focuses on using exercise and diet interventions to improve metabolic health, vascular function, and inflammation in people with type 2 diabetes. His PhD thesis aims to determine the effectiveness of a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet to improve glycemic control and reduce the need for glucose-lowering medications in type 2 diabetes.

Awards: NSERC PGS, Mitacs Accelerate, Innovations in Wellness Fund

Cody grew up in the Okanagan and has a passion for the outdoors. He enjoys hiking, camping, rock climbing, and snowboarding and can often be found exploring with his dog Watson.

Contact: cody.durrer@alumni.ubc.ca


Jinelle Gilenas

Jinelle Gelinas (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Neil Eves

Current Research: Investigating different phenotypes of exercise limitations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and methods to optimize exercise training for these patients. Jinelle also has a secondary research interest, which is investigating the cardiac and vascular link between COPD and cardiovascular disease and how exercise may affect this relationship.

Awards: Canadian Lung Association- Canadian Thoracic Society/ Canadian Respiratory Research Network Doctoral Studentship & The Frederick Hargreave Clinical Research Award

Future Aspirations: Her future aspirations include collaborating with national and international researchers to advance the knowledge surrounding pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with respiratory diseases, with the goal of one day becoming the director of a research-associated pulmonary rehabilitation centre.

Having grown up in the Okanagan, Jinelle enjoys the hot summers and local wines. She spends most of her time rock climbing in Squamish and at the local crags, skiing in the mountains and running and/or cycling in the hills of the valley.

Contact: jinelle.gelinas@ubc.ca


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Megan Harper (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Neil Eves

Current Research: Examined the mechanisms of shortness of breath in post-surgical patients with non-small cell lung cancer and develop therapeutic interventions for treating the disease. Specifically, she plans to investigate exercise training programs to overcome these limitations and to ultimately reduce shortness of breath and improve quality of life in this population.

Awards: Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships Doctoral Award.

Future Aspirations: Her future aspirations include conducting research and collaborating with others to work towards formalized exercise rehabilitation for post-surgical patients with lung cancer.

Megan grew up as a competitive Irish dancer and is now a certified dance instructor. She enjoys Okanagan summers, camping, running, and travel. She has spent time backpacking around Australia, New Zealand and Southeast Asia.

Contact: megan.harper@ubc.ca


Justine Magnuson (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Chris McNeil

Current Research: Justine uses transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography to study the effects of fatigue on neurophysiological function.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship
Justine completed her BSc in Chemistry and her MSc in Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology. She enjoys playing hockey, skiing, swimming, and camping.

Contact: justine.magnuson@ubc.ca


Megan McPherson (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Mary Jung

Current research: Megan’s work in the Diabetes Prevention Research Group focuses on the investigation and optimization of technology-related physical activity interventions. The overarching goal of Megan’s work is to determine how to best utilize technologies to positively impact physical activity and health behaviours in a variety of populations. Megan is systematically developing and implementing a text message intervention to increase exercise adherence following the Small Steps for Big Changes diabetes prevention program.

Awards: WorkSafeBC Graduate Research Training Award

Megan MacPherson completed her BA Honours in Psychology at the University of British Columbia followed by her Master’s of Science in Occupational Therapy (OT) at Queen’s University. Her future aspirations include working in a rehabilitation environment which combines her clinical and research training by working as an OT with research appointment.

Contact: meganmargaretmacpherson@gmail.com


Alex Patrician (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Phil Ainslie

Current Research: Alex’s research interests revolve around the capacity of the human body to acclimatize and adapt to environmental stressors, especially the challenges of hypoxia – either ascending to high altitude, or diving underwater on a single breath. Taking an integrated approach, including utilizing ultrasound imaging and data analysis techniques, his current projects specifically investigate 1) the influence of iron status on the physiological responses to hypoxia in lowlanders and high altitude natives; 2) elucidate the mechanisms of lung squeeze, an injury of the lungs that can occur during deep breath-hold diving.

Awards: NSERC Postgraduate Doctoral Scholarship and University Graduate Fellowship

Alex completed his BSc in Human Kinetics at the University of Guelph, and MSc in Extreme Physiology at Mid Sweden University. He thoroughly enjoys the many available winter and summer activities of the Okanagan.

Contact: alexander.patrician@alumni.ubc.ca


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Mathew Rieger (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Ali McManus

Current Research: Matt is interested in investigating new techniques to attenuate the negative consequences associated with high-altitude travel, and his graduate research focuses on the effects of ischemic preconditioning on vascular function during hypoxic exposures.

Born in Edmonton, Matt received his BSc. in Kinesiology from the University of Alberta in 2012. Later that year, he met several members of the CLVH research team while trekking in Nepal, and eventually moved to Kelowna to pursue a MSc.

Matt’s hobbies include skiing, playing hockey, hiking, and training for ultra-marathons, and most of his free time is spent exploring the trails around the Okanagan

Contact: matt.rieger@ubc.ca


Alex Santos (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Mary Jung

Current Research: Alex’s research focuses on diabetes prevention within the Small Steps for Big Changes program. Specifically, Alex is looking to see whether providing a choice between different types of physical activity (i.e. high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training) to people with prediabetes influences participants’ physical activity adherence and psychological well-being.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship, University Graduate Fellowship.

Future Aspirations: Alex hopes to one day teach at the university level in the field of exercise psychology, statistics, and physical activity & well-being.

Alex completed his Honours BSc in Human Kinetics and Masters degree in Sport Psychology at the University of Ottawa. Following his degrees, Alex worked at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario doing research on pediatric eating disorders and obesity before moving to Kelowna to begin his PhD.

Contact: alex.santos@ubc.ca


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John Sasso (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Neil Eves

Current Research: Designing targeted exercise training to improve autonomic nervous system dysfunction associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Future Aspirations: Investigating the autonomic dysfunction that is associated with many acute and chronic diseases (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, etc) and using a precision-exercise approach to reduce the ‘stress’ imparted by the underlying imbalance.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

John has always had more than a modest interest in both sports and science. He is a certified exercise physiologist and has worked in numerous research, sport science, teaching, coaching and clinical practice positions. John is an avid endurance sport enthusiast; he coaches (and sometimes participates in) running, cycling, triathlon, etc.

Contact: john.sasso@ubc.ca


Myp Sekhon (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Phil Ainslie

Current Research: Myp’s research interests include delineating the underlying cerebrovascular pathophysiology of hypoxic ischemic brain injury after cardiac arrest using invasive multimodal neuromonitoring. Specifically, he is conducting a series of first-in-human studies by placing catheters into the injured brain to characterize autoregulation, brain blood flow, metabolism, oxygenation and intracranial pressure in patients who have suffered a cardiac arrest to better help understand the pathophysiology and identifying targets of future therapeutic interventions.

Awards: Frederick Banting and Charles Best CIHR Doctoral Award, VCHRI Mentored Clinician Scientist Award, VCHRI Clinician Scientist Award, Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship, Graduate Fellowship

Myp completed his Doctor of Medicine degree at UBC in 2008. Thereafter, he completed internal medicine residency and critical care medicine fellowship at UBC from 2008 to 2013. He completed a neurocritical care fellowship at the University of Cambridge under Prof. David Menon from 2013 to 2015 and has been an attending intensive care physician at UBC since July 2015. He is the current Program Director for the UBC Critical Care Medicine Fellowship and a critical care transport physician for BC Ambulance. Myp’s most important role is being a husband to his wife, Becca and a father to their daughter, Lily.

Contact: mypindersekhon@gmail.com


Brooke Shafer (PhD student)

Supervisor: Dr. Glen Foster

Current Research: Brooke’s research focuses on the mechanistic pathways that contribute to the development of Obstructive Sleep Apnea-related Hypertension. The first aim of her research is to investigate how exposure to intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia affects blood pressure regulation through perturbations in carotid body chemoreflex sensitivity, sympathetic neural control, and redox homeostasis. The second aim of her research is to determine how treatment with antioxidants and angiotensin receptor blockade can mitigate these perturbations.

Future Aspirations: Brooke’s future aspirations aim to develop therapeutic strategies to reduce the incidence of Cardiovascular Disease in persons with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

Brooke is an avid outdoors lover from Virginia in the U.S. She graduated from James Madison University with her BSc in Kinesiology and MSc in Clinical Exercise Physiology. She loves hiking/backpacking, wine tasting, NFL football, and her two dachshunds!
Contact: brooke.shafer@alumni.ubc.ca


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Christine Tallon (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Ali McManus

Current Research: Christine is studying paediatric cerebral blood flow and exploring the influence of physical activity and sedentary behaviour on cerebral blood flow in this population.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

Future Aspirations: Her future aspirations revolve around continuing involvement with children in a health and exercise science capacity.

Christine has a strong passion for competition and adventure, having played 6 years of varsity soccer throughout her undergraduate degree, and has travelled to Costa Rica, Brazil, and Australia. She is already in search of the next adventure!

Contact: christine.tallon@ubc.ca


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Alexandra Yacyshyn (PhD candidate)

Supervisor: Dr. Chris McNeil

Current Research: Exploring the effects of TMS on spinal motoneuron excitability and investigating sex differences in the context of human fatigue and aging.

Alex completed her B.Sc. in general biology (winter 2014) and M.Sc. in interdisciplinary studies (spring 2016) at UBC Okanagan. Under the supervision of Dr. Chris McNeil, her M.Sc. thesis presented the novel pairing of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with ultrasonography to investigate intrinsic contractile properties of the calf muscles. She is actively involved in neuromuscular research on spinal motoneuron excitability and human fatigue (e.g. aerial firefighters; COPD patients; normobaric hypoxia).
Alex grew up as a nationally and internationally competitive athlete in Taekwondo. She is an enthusiastic youth group volunteer at her home church, sings with a fantastic worship team, and enjoys a wide variety of hobbies such as reading Victorian literature, collecting JRR Tolkien books, herding cattle, and hiking.

Contact: alex.yacyshyn@ubc.ca


MSc Students

 


Paige Copeland (MSC student)

Supervisor: Dr. Brian Dalton

Current Research: Paige is interested in the interactions between the vestibular system and various physiological functions, including autonomic nervous system activity. She is currently investigating the effect of electrical vestibular stimulation on cerebral blood flow.

Awards: NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Award, Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship, British Columbia Graduate Scholarship & NSERC Canada Graduate Scholarship- Master’s.

Paige grew up in the Okanagan, completing her Bachelor of Human Kinetics at UBCO in Clinical Exercise Physiology. During her undergraduate degree, she was involved in sensorimotor physiology and sport concussion research, primarily interested in neurological (dys)function. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, playing volleyball, and painting.

Contact: paige-copeland@alumni.ubc.ca


Paul Cotton (MSC student)

Supervisor: Dr. Glen Foster

Current Research: Paul’s research interests include the effects of physiological and pathological stressors on the distribution of blood flow between respiratory and locomotor muscles, and ultrasound image segmentation/processing. Paul’s MSc thesis aims to validate the use of a novel ultrasound imaging technique to quantify perfusion of the diaphragm.

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship and NSERC Canada Graduate Scholarship – Master’s.

Paul grew up in Vancouver and completed his Bachelor of Human Kinetics at UBC Okanagan in Clinical Exercise Physiology. He enjoys skiing, hockey, and playing guitar in his spare time.

Contact: paul.cotton@ubc.ca


Kaja Falkenhain (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Jonathan Little

Kaja was born in the land of sausages, beer and sauerkraut. She holds her undergraduate degree in Cognitive Science (a weird mixture of neuroscience, artificial intelligence, mathematics, philosophy of mind, linguistics, neuropsychology, machine learning and computer science) and completed her thesis exploring the effects of voluntary exercise on brain blood flow in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States.

After her first visit of Canada for an internship at the UBC Vancouver one year prior, she returned to BC to pursue her Master’s degree with Dr. Little, focusing primarily on the effects and mechanisms of a ketogenic diet and ketone supplements.

Her future aspirations include being able to perform a 25-foot handstand walk and a bar muscle-up, becoming Watson’s favourite lap and acquiring the Canadian sense of humour.

Contact: kajaf@mail.ubc.ca


Connor Howe (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Philip Ainslie

Current Research: Connor’s research focuses on examining the effects of high-altitude on cerebral blood flow regulation and pulmonary function in lowlanders and in various high-altitude native populations. Connor’s MSc thesis study is looking at using a non-invasive method to measure pulmonary gas exchange during exercise in healthy and sick Andean high-altitude natives living in the highest city in the world.

Awards: NSERC CGS-M and Graduate Deans Entrance Scholarship

Connor was born and raised in Kelowna and complete his BHK at UBCO in 2018. A long time Taekwondo athlete, Connor’s high-altitude research interests have resulted in an athletic shift to rock climbing.

Contact: connor.howe@alumni.ubc.ca


Garett Jackson (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Jonathan Little

Research Interests: Garett’s research focuses on changes in immune cell recruitment and mobilization in response to acute submaximal aerobic exercise in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Specifically, the response of these cells to an updated physical activity guidelines exercise bout for individuals living with both paraplegia and tetraplegia.

Awards: NSERC USRA, Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship (2018 and 2019), Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

Future Aspirations: Garett hopes to pursue a career in academia as a professor and researcher.

Garett completed his B.Sc. in Kinesiology at UBC Okanagan in 2018. He enjoys boxing, archery, playing guitar, biking and building/tuning import engines and turbo-systems.

Contact: garett.jackson@alumni.ubc.ca


Hogun Kang (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Brian Dalton

Research Interests: Hogun is interested in the brain’s biochemical and electrophysiological functions and capacity, and the ways in which it is disrupted in diseased states. Currently, he aims to investigate how cognitively debilitating conditions may relate to impaired performance of the central nervous system. His current study intends to explore the potential of 24-hour sleep deprivation as a proxy for clinical fatigue in health research.

Future Aspirations: Hogun hopes to pursue a career in medical research, with a focus on developing novel treatments and therapeutic techniques for neurological disorders.

Hogun completed his B.Sc. in Microbiology at UBCO (’18) while researching the genetic mechanisms of cellular toxin transport. He is passionate in teaching music to children and is also an outdoor sport enthusiast and adrenaline junkie.

Contact: hogunkang@alumni.ubc.ca


Liam King (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Ali McManus


Alyssa Koziol (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Ali McManus

Current Research: Alyssa’s research focuses on the effects prolonged sedentary time has on vascular health in children. Her current project is investigating how children and youth are growing up in Kelowna digitally, mentally, and physically. With specific interest in the association of patterning in sitting time and body mass index in children.

Future Aspirations: Her future aspirations include working with children and continue teaching.

Originally from Whitby Ontario, Alyssa received her Bachelors in Human Kinetics majoring in clinical exercise physiology at UBC Okanagan in 2018. During her final year she developed a particular interest in research and pediatric physiology. She enjoys camping, hiking, and skiing in her spare time.

Contact: alyssa57@alumni.ubc.ca


Helena Neudorf (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Jonathon Little

Current Research: Helena’s research is focused on exploring the ability of ketones to act as signalling molecules within the innate immune system, in the context of type 2 diabetes. Specifically, her MSc thesis focuses on determining the effect of ketone supplementation on signalling activity of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes.

Awards: UBC USRA, NSERC USRA, Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship, NSERC CGS-M Scholarship

Helena has been previously completed her bachelor of Human Kinetics at UBC Okanagan (2018) and has been working in Dr. Little’s lab since 2015. Her spare time is spent hiking, swimming, road cycling, and skiing.

Contact: h.neudorf@alumni.ubc.ca


Skylar Schmidtke (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Mary Jung

Skylar Schmidtke is a Master’s of Science student in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences. She completed her BA in Psychology at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. Skylar’s main research interest is looking at improving diet quality and overall physical health in children. Her research in Diabetes Prevention Research Group has examined the utility of intervention strategies on calcium consumption in child-parent dyads. She is currently helping to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive reframing on changes in adult activity levels.

Contact: sky.schmidt@hotmail.com


Megan Trotman (MSc student)

Supervisor: Dr. Brian Dalton

Research Interests: Megan is interested in the use of Electrical Vestibular Stimulation (EVS) to explore different aspects of the vestibular-evoked balance response. Her current project is investigating the effects of stability on the vestibular control of balance in intrinsic foot muscles, and she will also be looking into the vestibular-evoked balance response in patients with Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS).

Awards: Graduate Dean’s Entrance Scholarship

Megan received her Bachelors degree at UBC – Okanagan (2016) in Human Kinetics majoring in Clinical Exercise Physiology. Upon completion she took time off to travel to many countries around the world and spent time living and working in Australia. She also enjoys hiking, running, and playing basketball.

Contact: mtrotman@mail.ubc.ca