Affiliated Members

Dr. Brian Dalton

Assistant Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Dr. Dalton’s research interests focus on understanding the fundamental processes related to the sensorimotor control of the human neuromuscular system. His Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Laboratory is currently interested in exploring how acute (e.g., fatigue, hypoxia, muscle damage) and chronic (e.g., adult aging, pathology) adaptations affect human performance and the neural control of movement and balance.

Contact Email: brian.dalton@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Dr. Brian Dalton’s faculty webpage.


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Dr. Glen Foster

Associate Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Glen’s primary research interest lies with the cardiovascular system and its adaptations to hypoxia. However, to thoroughly investigate cardiovascular function other integrated systems must also be studied, including the pulmonary, renal, endocrine, and neural systems. To achieve this the cardiopulmonary laboratory for experimental and applied physiology is equipped with appropriate tools and technologies to study the integration of systems.

An important facet of Glen’s research program is his belief that physiological research and biomedical engineering must be combined to create new technologies that innovate future research and improve patient diagnostics or treatments.

Outside the lab, Glen enjoys spending time with his family, skiing, climbing, hiking, and cycling!

Contact Email: glen.foster@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Dr. Foster’s Faculty webpage.


Dr. Mary Jung

Associate Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Dr. Mary Jung is an Associate Professor at UBC in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences, and the Director of the Diabetes Prevention Research Group. Her research examines the self-regulation of health behaviours, particularly adherence to physical activity and healthy diets. Her current research program focuses on establishing and evaluating sustainable, community-based interventions that delay or stave off type 2 diabetes.

Contact Email: mary.jung@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Dr. Jung’s Diabetes Prevention Research Group webpage here: http://dprg.ok.ubc.ca 


Dr. Jonathan Little

Associate Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Dr. Little’s laboratory employs a broad spectrum of techniques, spanning from whole-body metabolic measurement in humans down to advanced molecular analyses in isolated cells. Studies range from applied exercise and nutritional interventions in clinical populations (e.g., patients with type 2 diabetes) to basic studies examining intracellular signaling pathways and gene expression in cultured cells. Current exercise studies are focused around the health benefits of high-intensity interval training whereas nutrition studies explore how low-carbohydrate diets and nutritional ketosis impact cardiometabolic health.

Contact Email: jonathan.little@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Dr. Little’s faculty webpage.


Prof. Ali McManus

Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Prof. McManus’s primary research interest revolves around the impact exercise has upon cardiorespiratory function, health and body composition during the growing years. She has been concerned with generating a greater appreciation of the metabolic benefits that exercise and/or habitual physical activity may confer in both healthy children and those with chronic disease. This entails the development of population measures of obesity and its associated health risks, the provision of a more comprehensive understanding of the complex metabolic bases of exercise and physical activity in children and ultimately the refinement of recommendations regarding exercise prescriptions.

Contact Email: ali.mcmanus@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Prof. McManus’ faculty webpage



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Dr. Chris McNeil

Assistant Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Chris’ primary research interests are in the mechanisms of muscle fatigue and the influence of aging on neuromuscular function. Cerebral and muscle blood flow greatly impact muscle performance, so Chris collaborates with other members of the Centre to advance our understanding of how the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and neuromuscular systems interact.

Chris commutes to UBC on his bicycle regardless of the conditions, so he’s grateful for the mild Okanagan winters. He also enjoys hiking and the understated brilliance of good comedy.

Contact Email: chris.mcneil@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Dr. McNeil’s Faculty webpage


Prof. Robert Shave

Professor

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development

Prof. Shave’s research examines the acute and chronic impact of exercise upon the heart in both health and disease. Using echocardiography and biomarkers Prof. Shave and his colleagues at Brunel University and Cardiff Metropolitan University have provided insight to the beneficial and potentially negative effects of endurance exercise upon the heart. In 2011 Prof. Shave established the International Primate Heart Project to examine heart disease in great apes and to provide insight into the evolution of the human heart. Now at UBC, Prof. Shave will continue to combine comparative and experimental physiology approaches to further understand structural and functional cardiovascular adaptations to exercise in a range of populations with a specific focus on evolutionary mismatch.

Contact Email: rob.shave@ubc.ca | For more information, please visit Prof. Shave’s Faculty webpage.