Academic Associates

Dr. Cristina Caperchione

University of Technology Sydney

Associate Professor Cristina M. Caperchione is a physical activity and health researcher in the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation at University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia. She leads the health promotion discipline within the school and is subject co-ordinator in the areas of Health-related physical activity, Sport and Exercise Psychology, and Health and Lifespan Development. A/Prof. Caperchione’s research program focuses on the use of behavioural change strategies and socio-cultural factors in the prevention, reduction and management of chronic disease. Specifically, her expertise lies in designing, implementing, and evaluating innovative community-based health promotion interventions, with a particular focus on healthy lifestyle behaviours (i.e., physical activity, healthy eating, and practices for improving mental health) of priority populations including cancer survivors, inactive men, and at-risk adolescent girls. Given the focus on community, a large component of A/Prof. Caperchione’s work also involves building strong community relationships with industry partners and local community members.

Email: Cristina.Caperchione@uts.edu.au



Dr. Mike Stembridge

Cardiff Metropolitan University

Mike is a Reader in Cardiovascular and Environmental Physiology within the Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences in the UK. His collaboration with the Centre for Heart, Lung and Vascular Health started in 2012 with the Nepal Everest Expedition where he investigated the short-term and life-long effects of high altitude exposure on cardiac physiology. Since then, Mike has collaborated with numerous members of the Centre including Prof. Phil Ainslie, Prof. Ali McManus, Prof. Neil Eves, Dr Glen Foster and Prof. Rob Shave. Since 2012, Mike’s transatlantic collaboration has co-authored 45 publications with members of the Centre and facilitated the bi-directional mobility of over 10 postgraduate students.

Mike’s research focuses on the integration of physiological systems during acute and chronic adaptation to exercise and environmental stimuli, and how these interactions change during natural periods of development such as adolescence. To explore these research interests, he has used a wide range of techniques in the assessment of cardiac, cerebrovascular, haematological and neurological physiology. These techniques have been applied in humans of all ages, often utilising intricate interventions to isolate and manipulate specific mechanisms to help understand population differences observed.

Email: mstembridge@cardiffmet.ac.uk